Moni's Guesthouse in Barranco, Peru

 

There is a district in Peru full of artists and colors, and free expression, where building walls, tunnel-domes, alley ways, lampposts, and bridges, are either works of art or (more rarely) blank canvases waiting for a painter to initiate them into the gallery of Barranco.

Yes, Barranco—the district of artists.

I’d been in the country seven weeks, with two weeks left in my stay, when I stumbled upon Moni’s Guesthouse on Airbnb, just blocks from the Ocean. The pictures were lovely, the location was ideal, and I couldn’t pass up the chance to stay in Barranco before departing Peru. 

I was traveling solo, so the walkability of the area and the safety within the house (something I had learned from experience was not something that could be assumed) was crucial. Moni was a superhost on Airbnb, with hundreds and hundreds of five-star reviews, and her street was picturesque and safe, so in the end it was an easy decision.

The day I arrived, Moni was there to greet me with a huge smile. She showed me around the house, and warned me endearingly to watch my step in the courtyard, as her two pet quail sometimes got underfoot. Every time I saw her, she was radiating warmth and happiness towards her guests. She was a rare woman, overflowing with hospitality and kindness. No matter what I needed—walking directions to the nearest bakery, recommendations for restaurants, or the channel number to watch the Oscars in English—she responded to my texts in seconds, eager to make sure I had everything I could possibly need when I needed it, even if it meant jumping in a taxi and rushing home.  

I stayed in the "Shorty" room the first week, and then moved to a larger room on the top floor called "Iquitos," with a private bathroom. Outside my room, was an open-air hallway-balcony. I sat at the rail with my coffee in the mornings while the fog rolled heavy across the rooftops, and drank amber Cusquena beer, as dusk fell and the lights flickered on in windows across the city. It was peaceful, safe, and comfortable.

The location turned out to be even better than I had hoped for, walkable to everything—pharmacies, bakeries, supermarkets, cafes, restaurants, nightlife, the metro, the art museum. There was a charming park on the corner, filled with green parrots that hid behind the elephant-ear leaves of giant trees; it was a place where families lingered after school till twilight and was a hub of the community. I read books there, on a bench hedged cozily between bushes abundant with pale pink flowers, as children dashed about around the loops of the park on scooters and rollerblades, becoming fast friends and forming clubs.

Three blocks towards the ocean, was my café—La Bodega Verde—with my favorite baristas in the  city. Every afternoon, I walked to the café to write, and then wound my way along the coastline path where the cliffs fell away into the ocean, and the sun made shimmering trails across the waves.

I was happy here.

Moni lived in the bottom level of the guesthouse with her wonderful husband Mario, nine-year-old daughter Leah, and three small dogs—Tequila, Bombo and Pelo. There was a lot of love between them, and they filled the house with their happy vibes. After the first week, Moni invited me into her home for dinner, and the four of us gathered around delectably seasoned roasted chicken, papa fritas, salads, and, of course, Inka Cola.

Over the food, I prompted her to tell me her story and learned that she and Mario had been high school sweethearts, one of those couples who’d always known they belonged together. She’d been studying law when her unexpected pregnancy with Leah compelled her to reroute her career. Her first BnB venture had been with her Mother’s house while she was pregnant, and from that time on, she was hooked. Strangers from all over the world had become her guests and then her dear friends. After that, she gave up law, and she and Mario bought this ten-bedroom house in their favorite district, and never looked back.     

I loved my stay with Moni. The day I left was a sad one for me; Mario helped me carry my heavy bags down the stairs, and they both waited for the taxi with me outside, and hugged me goodbye, wishing me well with my life and travels.

I am in a different country now, but it still comforts my soul to remember that in Peru, there is an artist district, called Barranco. And in that district, lies a park full of happy children and parrots and pink flowers. And near that park stands a great white house with shutters thrown open. And in that house lives one of the loveliest families you may ever meet.

There are some places and people worth rerouting to meet. When you do, give Moni a hug from Willa—and remember...

Don't step on the quail.

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 The Plaza

The Plaza

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 The Plaza

The Plaza

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 Barranco

Barranco

 The art walk across the way

The art walk across the way

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 The park by Moni's

The park by Moni's

 La Bodega Verde

La Bodega Verde

 The coastline path.

The coastline path.

 Moni's Guesthouse

Moni's Guesthouse